Electrical Skills

  • Series includes the following titles:
    • Using Electronic Test Equipment, Part 1
    • Using Electronic Test Equipment, Part 2
    • Using Electronic Test Equipment, Part 3
    • Basic Electricity Review
    • Maintenance of High-Voltage Circuit Breakers
    • Maintenance of Low-Voltage Circuit Breakers
    • AC Motor Controller Maintenance, Part 1
    • AC Motor Controller Maintenance, Part 2
    • Alternating Current
    • Electrical 2: Boxes and Fittings
    • Electrical Wiring: Cables and Conductors
    • Electrical 2: Circuit Breakers and Fuses
    • Electrical Wiring: Conduit Installation
    • Electrical 1: Conductors
    • Contactors and Relays
    • Electrical 1: Cable Tray
    • Electrical 1: Commercial and Industrial Wiring
    • DC Motor Maintenance
    • Electrical 1: Electrical Diagrams
    • Electrical 2: Electrical Lighting
    • Electrical 1: Electrical Safety
    • Electrical Maintenance: Fasteners
    • Electrical 2: Grounding
    • Electrical Maintenance: Introduction To The NEC
    • Electrical 2: Installation of Electrical Services
    • Motor Branch Circuit Protection
    • Electrical 2: Motors: Theory and Application
    • Raceways
    • Electrical Maintenance: Troubleshooting Electrical Circuits
    • Electrical Maintenance: Battery Systems
    • Three-Phase AC Induction Motor Maintenance
    • Electrical Wiring: Splices and Terminations
    • Safety: Electrical
    • Introduction to Basic Diagrams and Symbols, Part 1
    • Introduction to Basic Diagrams and Symbols, Part 2
    • Electrical Equipment: AC and DC Motors
    • Transformers, Breakers, and Switches
    • Electrical Equipment: Electrical Production and Distribution
    • Electrical Equipment: Motor Controllers and Operation
    • Plant Science: Basic Electrical Circuits
    • Plant Science: Basic Electrical Principles
    • Electrical Safety
    • Lockout/Tagout
    • Direct and Alternating Current
    • AC Generator Basics
    • AC Motor Basics
    • Maintenance of Air and Oil Circuit Breakers
    • 2012 NFPA 70e & Electrical Hazard Analysis
    • Batteries
    • Basic Control Circuits
    • Basic Electrical Safety
    • Construction of AC and DC Circuits
    • Capacitors, part 1
    • capacitors, Part 2
    • Conductors
    • DC Generator Basics
    • DC Motor Basics
    • Electronic Circuit Board Rpair
    • Electromagnetic Relays
    • ESD Precautions
    • Fuses
    • Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters
    • Grounding
    • Inductors, Part 1
    • Inductors, Part 2
    • Insulators
    • Industrial Switches
    • Kirchhoff’s Laws
    • Magnets and Magnetic Fields
    • Measuring Current, Voltage and Resistance
    • Operational Amplifier Circuits
    • Use of OHM’s and Kirchhoff’s Laws in DC Circuits
    • OHM’s Law
    • Parallel Circuits
    • Programmable Logic Controllers: Architecture
    • Programmable Logic Controllers: Human-Machine Interfaces andTtroubleshooting
    • Programmable Logic Controllers: I/O Communication
    • Programmable Logic Controllers: Introduction to Programming, Part 1
    • Programmable Logic Controllers: Introduction to Programming, Part 2
    • Programmable Logic Controllers: Ladder Logic and Symbology
    • programmable logic controllers: networks and network troubleshooting
    • Programmable Logic Controllers: Numerics, Part 1
    • Programmable Logic Controllers: Numerics, Part 2
    • Principles of Semiconductors, Part 1: Bipolar Transistors
    • Principles of Semiconductors, Part 2: Bipolar Transistors
    • Programmable Logic Controllers: Program Entry, Testing, and Modification, Part 1
    • Programmable Logic Controllers: Program Entry, Testing, and Modification, Part 2
    • Programmable Logic Controllers: Programming Functions, Part 1
    • Programmable Logic Controllers: Programming Functions, Part 2
    • Programmable Logic Controllers: Troubleshooting Hardware
    • PLCs: Troubleshooting Software, Part 1
    • PLCs: Troubleshooting Software, Part 2
    • Resistors
    • Reading and Understanding Schematics
    • Series Circuits
    • Sources of Electricity, Part 1
    • Series-Parallel Circuits
    • Troubleshooting Operational Amplifier Circuits
    • Troubleshooting Power Supplies
    • Troubleshooting Systems and Circuits
    • Transformers
    • Voltage and Current Principles
    • Variable Speed Drives: Common Applications
    • Variable Speed Drives: Controllers and Troubleshooting, Part 1
    • Variable Speed Drives: Controllers and Troubleshooting, Part 2
    • Variable Speed Drives: Installation
    • Variable Speed Drives: Introduction to VSDS
    • Variable Speed Drives: Programming AC Controllers
    • Variable Speed Drives: Programming DC Controllers
    • Variable Speed Drives: Systems and Integration
    • Variable Speed Drives: System Troubleshooting, Part 1
    • Variable Speed Drives: System Troubleshooting, Part 2
    • AC Fundamentals Review
    • DC Motor Controller Maintenance, Part 1
    • DC Motor Controller Maintenance, Part 2
    • DC Fundamentals Review
    • Reading Electrical Diagrams, Part 1
    • Reading Electrical Diagrams, Part 2
    • Synchronous Motor and Controller Maintenance
    • Single-Phase AC Induction Motor Maintenance
    • Transformer Maintenance
    • Using Electrical Test Equipment
    • Basic Electronics, Part 1
    • Basic Electronics, Part 2
    • Electrical Systems and Equipment, Part 1
    • Electrical Systems and Equipment, Part 2
    • Electrical Systems
    • Cost Estimating: Fundamentals
    • Safety: Electrical Part 1 - Fundamentals, Materials & Equipment Grounding
    • Safety: Electrical Part 2 – Hazardous Location, Clearances & Safety Practice
    • Electrical Tools: Digital Multimeters I – Operation
    • ElectricalTtools: Digital Multimeters II – Applications
    • Overcurrent Protection II – Coordination
    • Strategies For Implementing NFPA 70e®
    • 2015 NFPA 70e® - Significant Changes
    • Electrical and Arc Flash Hazards
    • Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC’s) - Introduction and Theory of Operations
    • Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC’s) - Logic Operations
    • ProgrammableLlogic Controllers (PLC’s) - Hardware,Iinputs, Outputs, Discrete/Analog
    • Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC’s) - Programming a PLC System
    • Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC’s) - Design and Installation of a PLC System
    • Electrical Maintenance: Relays, Part 1
    • Electrical Maintenance: Relays, Part 2

The Electrical Skills Training Series is a world-class course curriculum for electrical maintenance staff. The highly interactive e-learning courseware offers a progressive training experience that supports training and cross-training programs at multiple levels and skills sets.

A well-trained, electrical maintenance staff, coupled with the performance of regular industrial electrical maintenance tests, is critical to ensuring safe, reliable operation. The Electrical Skills Courses include real-world video, animated graphics, pop-up descriptions, demonstrations and simulations, designed to put the student “on location” in real situational examples and to:

  • Increase safety
  • Increase baseline knowledge
  • keep pace with electrical technological change
  • Move from a repair/replace focus to predictive preventative maintenance
  • Evolve to multi-craft performance and efficiency

Courses provide learning from basic to more advanced concepts. In most learning plans, courses become progressively more difficult and provide a measurable, steady development as an employee advances to upper tiers. For example, a course labelled Electrical Theory Tier 2 will be increasingly more challenging than Electrical Theory Tier 1.

All courses are authored by a team of more than 100 subject matter/industry experts to ensure professional organization requirements are met. In addition, all instructional designers are committed to delivering exceptional course presentations.

COURSE FEATURES

The engaging training design of the Electrical Skills Training Series emphasizes the use of real-world video, interactive learning techniques and comprehensive tracking to ensure active employee participation and retention.

COURSE DESIGN

  • Course Introduction
  • Stated Learning Objectives
  • Learning Helps – Including a Main Menu with a Course Outline and Glossary of Terms
  • Interactive Course Modules – In-depth content, using any combination of demonstrative examples, still and animated graphics, integrated video, review activities, practice questions and rolling audio transcription.
  • Integrated Workbooks
  • Pre & Post Tests – To validate learning needs before the training and the level of achieved skill knowledge after training.

Real-World Situations – Training built around original (non-stock), incident-based video footage puts the student “on location.” Situational examples drive retention on procedures, troubleshooting and hazardous events.

Interactive Approach – Emphasis on engaging adult learning techniques including; object-based interactivity (“click on image to learn more”), drag and drop mechanisms, ongoing knowledge checks, pop-up glossaries, and back-and-forth capabilities.

Extensive Support Guides – Detailed workbooks and glossaries are invaluable on the job reference tools and are integrated into the online training. These are available online during the training and as printable PDFs. These are especially effective in supporting compliance-driven education.

Comprehensive Evaluations and Progress Tracking – Flexible pre-test, knowledge checks and post-test evaluation methods with configurable passing levels, student grading and progress tracking, all managed via an integrated online learning management platform.

COURSE TITLES:

USING ELECTRONIC TEST EQUIPMENT, PART 1

Electronic instruments are designed to operate at specific levels of current, voltage, and resistance. The most basic type of electronic test equipment used by instrument technicians is the meter. This course focuses on the meters most commonly used to indicate the level of current, voltage, or resistance in a circuit or component. The meters covered in this course are the volt-ohm-milliammeter (VOM), the vacuum tube volt-ohmmeter (VTVM), the field effect transistor volt-ohmmeter (FETVOM), the digital multimeter (DMM or DVM), and the transistor tester.

USING ELECTRONIC TEST EQUIPMENT, PART 2

This course is designed to familiarize participants with the basic operation and use of digital and analog oscilloscopes. After completing this course, participants should be able to explain what an oscilloscope does, explain how to set up an oscilloscope for use, identify the controls used to adjust an oscilloscope display, and explain how to use an oscilloscope to make voltage measurements and time measurements.

USING ELECTRONIC TEST EQUIPMENT, PART 3

This course focuses on five common pieces of electronic test equipment used for troubleshooting and calibration of electronic circuits and instruments. These are a resistance decade box, a signal generator, an alternating current/direct current (AC/DC) power supply, a vacuum tube tester, and a millivolt potentiometer. The course begins with a discussion of bridge circuits. This discussion provides a background for the explanation of the resistance decade box.

BASIC ELECTRICITY REVIEW

This course introduces the fundamental principles of electrical theory as applied to electrical circuits and devices such as transformers, inductors, and capacitors. The general topics covered in this course include the nature of electricity, basic electrical quantities and their units of measurement, electrical circuits, and electromagnetism.

MAINTENANCE OF HIGH-VOLTAGE CIRCUIT BREAKERS

After completing this course, you should be able to describe the basic operation of an oil circuit breaker, an air-magnetic circuit breaker, a vacuum circuit breaker, and an SF6 gas puffer circuit breaker. You should also be able to explain how each type of circuit breaker extinguishes an arc, and you should be able to describe basic procedures for racking out high-voltage circuit breakers and performing routine maintenance and testing on them.

MAINTENANCE OF LOW-VOLTAGE CIRCUIT BREAKERS

Circuit breakers and switchgear are among the most common, yet critical, components of an industrial electrical system. Circuit breakers are devices that interrupt or complete electrical circuits. They protect systems and equipment from the effects of excessive current, and they provide a way to switch power on and off and isolate circuits or equipment on which work is being performed. Switchgear is basically a self-contained, enclosed assembly of circuit breakers and auxiliary devices. Part of your responsibility involves keeping circuit breakers and switchgear working properly. So, it is important for you to have a good understanding of how circuit breakers work and the types of maintenance procedures that are typically performed on them.

AC MOTOR CONTROLLER MAINTENANCE, PART 1

This course introduces participants to AC motor controllers, which are devices, or groups of devices, that control the operation of alternating current (AC) motors. They can start, stop, or protect a motor; control its speed; and change its direction. By doing so, AC motor controllers make it possible to use motors more effectively in industrial operations. In most industrial facilities, electrical maintenance personnel are responsible for maintaining AC motor controllers and correcting any controller problems that arise.

AC MOTOR CONTROLLER MAINTENANCE, PART 2

Alternating current (AC) motor controllers serve a vital function in industrial facilities: They control the operation of AC motors. Therefore, when a controller breaks down, it is essential for electrical maintenance personnel to know how to locate the cause of the controller malfunction and be able to make the necessary corrections. It is also important for electrical maintenance personnel to be able to maintain the AC motor controllers in their facilities so that they operate with maximum efficiency and a minimum number of breakdowns. This course deals specifically with troubleshooting and maintenance procedures for AC motor controllers.

ALTERNATING CURRENT

Alternating Current is a course designed to familiarize participants with how alternating current (AC) circuits work, and how voltage and current can change depending on the load, the source, and how the load and source are connected together. After completing this course, participants should be able to determine current and voltage values for an AC sine wave; explain how resistance, inductance, and capacitance affect AC circuits; explain how to calculate power in AC circuits and how to adjust power by correctly selecting and sizing circuit components; and describe the construction, operation, and use of various types of transformers.

ELECTRICAL 2: BOXES AND FITTINGS

Boxes and Fittings is a course designed to familiarize participants with various types of boxes and fittings used in electrical installations. After completing this course, participants should be able to identify different types of boxes and explain how to properly size outlet boxes, pull boxes, and junction boxes. They should also be able to identify different types of couplings, locknuts, and bushings, and explain what seal-off fittings are and how they are installed. In addition, they should be able to describe the three classes of hazardous locations that are identified in the National Electrical Code® (NEC®) and describe requirements for safely installing boxes and fittings in hazardous locations.

ELECTRICAL WIRING: CABLES AND CONDUCTORS

This course is designed to familiarize participants with the basic construction and installation of electrical cables and conductors. After completing this course, participants should be able to describe the basic construction of cables and conductors, and describe how conductors are classified and rated. They should also be able to describe factors that affect the installation of a conductor for a specific application, and describe how to make splices and terminations.

ELECTRICAL 2: CIRCUIT BREAKERS AND FUSES

Circuit Breakers and Fuses is a course designed to familiarize participants with the use of overcurrent protective devices in electrical installations. After completing this course, participants should be able to describe hazards associated with faults and overloads, describe the operation and common types of circuit breakers and fuses, and describe basic procedures for troubleshooting problems with circuit breakers and fuses.

ELECTRICAL WIRING: CONDUIT INSTALLATION

This course is designed to familiarize participants with the basic concepts of conduit and conduit fittings, and typical methods of cutting, bending, and installing conduit. After completing this course, participants should be able to describe the basic types of metallic and nonmetallic conduit, describe common types of conduit fittings, and describe procedures for cutting, bending, and installing metallic and nonmetallic conduit.

ELECTRICAL 1: CONDUCTORS

This course is designed to familiarize participants with the construction and use of various types of conductors and cables. After completing this course, participants should be able to describe the physical construction of conductors, explain how to determine the electrical capacity of a conductor, identify various types of conductor assemblies, and describe procedures for pulling conductors through conduit.

CONTACTORS AND RELAYS

Contactors and Relays is a course designed to familiarize participants with the operation and use of magnetic contactors and relays. After completing this course, participants should be able to describe the operating principles of magnetic contactors and relays, and explain how both types of devices are used in electrical systems. They should also be able to describe the components and operation of low-voltage remote control switching systems.

ELECTRICAL 1: CABLE TRAY

Cable Tray is a course designed to familiarize participants with cable tray components and installation techniques. After completing this course, participants should be able to identify the types of sections and the types of fittings used in cable tray assemblies, explain how cable tray is supported, and explain how cable tray sections are spliced. They should also be able to size cable tray for specific numbers and types of conductors.

ELECTRICAL 1: COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL WIRING

This course is designed to familiarize participants with wiring devices and wiring techniques used at commercial and industrial sites. After completing this course, participants should be able to identify various types of switches, enclosures, control devices, and receptacles. They should also be able to describe basic techniques for planning and installing branch circuits, mounting boxes, and working with conductors.

DC MOTOR MAINTENANCE

Anyone who is responsible for maintaining direct current (DC) motors in an industrial facility has to have a thorough understanding of the specific techniques and procedures that are used to keep DC motors in top operating condition. Familiarity with the ways that DC motors operate and the methods used to classify and identify them is also important. To help prepare electrical maintenance personnel for working on DC motors, this course contains specific information covering DC motor operation and classification as well as detailed descriptions of procedures for troubleshooting, disassembling, inspecting, and reassembling a typical DC motor.

ELECTRICAL 1: ELECTRICAL DIAGRAMS

This course is designed to familiarize participants with various types of electrical diagrams. After completing this course, participants should be able to explain why symbols are used on electrical diagrams, and how to obtain information from a title block and an equipment location index. They should also be able to explain how to use each of the following types of diagrams: block, single line, schematic, wiring, connection, interconnection, and raceway.

ELECTRICAL 2: ELECTRICAL LIGHTING

Electric Lighting is a course designed to familiarize participants with various types of lamps and lighting fixtures and how install them. After completing this course, participants should be able to explain how the human eye sees and describe the characteristics of light. They should also be able to compare and contrast various types of lamps, and they should be able to explain how to install various types of light fixtures.

ELECTRICAL 1: ELECTRICAL SAFETY

The purpose of this course is to give participants a general understanding of basic principles of electricity and electrical safety. At the conclusion of this course, participants will have a basic understanding of various aspects of working safely around electrical equipment.

ELECTRICAL MAINTENANCE: FASTENERS

This course is designed to familiarize participants with various types of fasteners used in electrical work. After completing this course, participants should be able to describe common types of threaded and non-threaded fasteners and identify applications for which each type might be used. They should also be able to describe basic procedures for installing fasteners.

ELECTRICAL 2: GROUNDING

Grounding is a course designed to familiarize participants with both system grounding and equipment grounding. After completing this course, participants should be able to describe different types of grounding, describe National Electrical Code® (NEC®) requirements associated with system grounding, and describe how to size and install grounding electrode conductors. They should also be able to describe NEC requirements associated with equipment grounding, describe how to size equipment grounding conductors and bonding jumpers, and explain how to make sure that a grounding system is effective.

ELECTRICAL MAINTENANCE: INTRODUCTION TO THE NEC

This course is designed to familiarize participants with the organization and layout of the National Electrical Code® (NEC®). After completing this course, participants should be able to use the NEC to locate specific types of information.

ELECTRICAL 2: INSTALLATION OF ELECTRICAL SERVICES

Installation of Electric Services is a course designed to familiarize participants with considerations associated with installing a commercial or industrial electric service. After completing this course, participants should be able to describe various types of electric services for commercial and industrial installations, and they should be able to identify and describe the main components of those services. They should also be able to explain how to select and install equipment for a single-phase service and a three-phase service.

MOTOR BRANCH CIRCUIT PROTECTION

A motor branch circuit, or motor branch, is a circuit that provides power and protection for a motor. According to the National Electrical Code® (NEC®), a motor branch must have a means to disconnect the entire branch from its power supply and a means to protect the branch components from the potentially damaging effects of excessive current. How a motor branch functions and how the necessary protection is provided are the subjects of this course.

ELECTRICAL 2: MOTORS: THEORY AND APPLICATION

This course is designed to familiarize participants with the operation and use of various types of electric motors. After completing this course, participants should be able to describe the basic construction and operation of direct current (DC) motors, alternating current (AC) induction motors, and AC synchronous motors. They should also be able to explain how motor speed can be controlled and how motors and motor circuits can be protected from damage, and they should be able to interpret the information on a motor nameplate.

RACEWAYS

This course is designed to familiarize participants with various types of raceways used to house electrical wiring. After completing this course, participants should be able to describe various types of raceways, including conduit, wireways, and cable trays. They should also be able to describe procedures for installing raceways in various types of environments.

ELECTRICAL MAINTENANCE: TROUBLESHOOTING ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS

This course is designed to familiarize participants with the use of basic troubleshooting procedures to troubleshoot problems in electrical circuits. After completing this course, participants should be able to identify and describe the main steps of a basic troubleshooting procedure and use the procedure to troubleshoot problems in electrical equipment and electrical systems.

ELECTRICAL MAINTENANCE: BATTERY SYSTEMS

This course is designed to introduce participants to industrial battery systems, battery cells, and how to inspect and test batteries. After completing this course, participants should know the characteristics and basic operation of a typical battery system and its components. They should also understand how to inspect and perform basic tests on industrial batteries.

THREE-PHASE AC INDUCTION MOTOR MAINTENANCE

This course covers three-phase alternating current (AC) induction motors, which use magnetic induction to convert three-phase AC power into mechanical energy. They are used throughout industry to drive equipment such as conveyor belts, pumps, air compressors, and generators. Three-phase AC induction motors are economical, efficient, and reliable. But, although they are reliable, they may still break down. Electrical maintenance personnel are responsible for maintaining the three-phase induction motors in their plant and for fixing any AC motors that have broken down.

ELECTRICAL WIRING: SPLICES AND TERMINATIONS

This course is designed to familiarize participants with common types of hardware and accessories used in making electrical splices and terminations, and how to prepare for and make various types of connections. After completing this course, participants should be able to identify basic types of terminals, connectors, tools, and materials used in making splices and terminations, and describe the applications for which they are suitable. They should also be able to describe how to make some common types of electrical splices and conductor terminations.

SAFETY: ELECTRICAL

This course is designed to familiarize participants with basic principles of electricity and electrical safety. After completing this course, participants will have a basic understanding of various aspects of working safely around electrical equipment.

INTRODUCTION TO BASIC DIAGRAMS AND SYMBOLS, PART 1

Industrial process plants contain many types of systems, and these systems can be very complex. One of the best ways to become familiar with a system is to follow diagrams. The information contained on plant diagrams can help an operator understand how plant systems are laid out and how they operate. This course covers various types of diagrams and symbols associated with process plant systems.

INTRODUCTION TO BASIC DIAGRAMS AND SYMBOLS, PART 2

Industrial process plants contain many types of systems, and these systems can be very complex. One of the best ways to become familiar with a system is to follow diagrams. The information contained on plant diagrams can help an operator understand how plant systems are laid out and how they operate.

ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT: AC AND DC MOTORS

This course is designed to familiarize participants with basic concepts associated with the operation of electric motors. After completing this course, participants should be able to explain the basic principles of motor operation and describe the basic operation of a simple alternating current (AC) motor and a simple direct current (DC) motor. They should also be able to identify the parts of a typical AC motor and a typical DC motor, and describe the function of each part.

TRANSFORMERS, BREAKERS, AND SWITCHES

This course is designed to familiarize participants with basic concepts associated with the operation of transformers, circuit breakers, and various types of switches. After completing this course, participants should be able to explain the basic principles of transformer operation, identify some of the basic components of a transformer, and describe checks that are generally made during a transformer inspection. They should also be able to describe the general operation of a circuit breaker, explain how to reset a tripped circuit breaker and how to rack out a circuit breaker, and describe the basic operation of pushbutton switches and rotary switches.

ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT: ELECTRICAL PRODUCTION & DISTRIBUTION

This course is designed to familiarize participants with basic concepts associated with the production and distribution of electric power for use by process systems. After completing this course, participants should be able to explain, in general terms, how off-site power comes into a plant and how a plant can generate power on site for its own use. They should also be able to identify and explain the functions of the major components in an electrical distribution system. In addition, participants should be able to describe general hazards associated with these systems and explain how the possible effects of the hazards can be minimized.

ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT: MOTOR CONTROLLERS AND OPERATION

This course is designed to familiarize participants with basic concepts associated with what motor controllers do and how they do it. Typical steps for starting up, checking, and shutting down motors are also covered. After completing this course, participants should be able to explain how motor controllers control and protect motors. They should also be able to describe how to start up a motor, perform operating checks on a motor, and shut down a motor.

PLANT SCIENCE: BASIC ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS

This course is designed to familiarize participants with basic principles associated with the parts and operation of electrical circuits. After completing this course, participants should be able to identify the parts of a basic circuit; describe the relationships between voltage, current, and resistance in a circuit; explain how current flows through series circuits and parallel circuits; describe the basic operation of transformers, fuses, circuit breakers, and solenoids; and explain how voltmeters and ammeters can help operators detect electrical problems.

PLANT SCIENCE: BASIC ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLES

This course is designed to familiarize participants with the basic principles of electricity and the basic operation of electric motors. After completing this course, participants should be able to explain what electricity is and how it can be produced by chemical action, heat, light, and magnetic effects. They should also be able to describe the basic operation of a direct current (DC) motor, a single-phase alternating current (AC) motor, and a three-phase AC motor.

ELECTRICAL SAFETY

Safety is especially important for anyone who works around electricity. Even though electricity cannot be seen, it can be extremely hazardous unless the proper precautions are taken. This course will reinforce your understanding of the hazards associated with electricity and the actions that you can take to protect yourself from those hazards.

LOCKOUT/TAGOUT

Uncontrolled hazardous energy is a potential cause of workplace accidents. This course covers hazardous energy and how to control it by isolating equipment using lockout/tagout procedures.

DIRECT AND ALTERNATING CURRENT

Most electric power is generated and consumed in the form of alternating current (AC), and most meters that measure energy consumption are designed to measure AC power. Many of the principles associated with direct current (DC) circuits also apply to AC circuits. This course describes variations that account for differences between DC power and AC power.

AC GENERATOR BASICS

A generator is a device that converts mechanical energy into electrical energy. AC generators are commonly used to provide electrical energy for a wide range of commercial, domestic, and industrial applications. AC generators vary considerably in size, from small ones like automobile generators, to large generators that can supply power needs for a large city.
The purpose of this training course is to focus on AC generators that are primarily used to supply electrical power in the magnitude of kilowatts (thousands of watts) and megawatts (millions of watts).

AC MOTOR BASICS

Electric motors provide the mechanical energy that is needed to operate a wide variety of equipment in an industrial facility. To make sure that the motors in their plant are operating properly, operators should be familiar with the fundamentals of motor operation and the basic operating characteristics of AC motors. In this course, the trainee will learn about the basic operation of an AC motor as well as its parts and functions.

MAINTENANCE OF AIR AND OIL CIRCUIT BREAKERS

Circuit breakers are devices that open or close a set of electrical contacts to interrupt or complete an electrical circuit. A switchgear is a self-contained, enclosed assembly of circuit breakers and related components. Both circuit breakers and switchgear serve to protect plant circuits from various electrical problems. They can switch power on and off, and they can isolate circuits on which work is being performed. Electrical maintenance personnel are responsible for keeping circuit breakers and switchgear working properly and for performing periodic inspections and any necessary repairs. This course covers the operation and maintenance of high-voltage circuit breakers and switchgear (4 KV and above) that are typically used for in-plant distribution of electrical power. Many high-voltage circuit breakers used for transmission purposes consist of three single-phase breakers connected to a common operating mechanism. However, the distribution breakers discussed in this course are three-phase breakers.

2012 NFPA 70E & ELECTRICAL HAZARD ANALYSIS

This course addresses the requirements and methods in the 2012 NFPA® 70E®: Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace® for analyzing the hazards and risks of work that involves exposure to electrical hazards. Key topics include significant changes to the NFPA® 70E standard for the 2012 edition and the methods and steps for calculating incident energy. The final topic is selection of appropriate safe work practices, including personal protective equipment.

BATTERIES

A battery is a primary component of a substation or switchyard direct current (DC) control system. The function of the control system is to supply control power to operate critical devices such as protective relays, alarms and status indicators, supervisory and communications equipment, and switchgear operating circuits. This course describes the role of the battery in the DC control system, the components of a lead-acid battery, how a battery works, battery ratings, and general battery inspection steps.

BASIC CONTROL CIRCUITS

An electric motor controller is a device, or group of devices, that governs the way that electric power is delivered to a motor. A motor controller is used to regulate, either partially or totally, the functions of the motor. This course provides an overview of both alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) motor controllers, their types, and their basic functions.

BASIC ELECTRICAL SAFETY

A good understanding of electrical safety can help prevent accidents on the job. Workers must be aware of electrical hazards and be familiar with the protective devices in electrical systems, as well as the safety practices that help prevent injuries and equipment damage. In this course, participants will learn how to work safely and what to do in case of an emergency such as electrical shock.

CONSTRUCTION OF AC AND DC CIRCUITS

This course will define series circuits and parallel circuits as well as series-parallel circuits. This course will also discuss resistance and current in each type of circuit.

CAPACITORS, PART 1

Capacitors are used to control and increase the amount of capacitance in electrical circuits. In this course, participants will learn about the principles, function, and construction of capacitors as well as how to calculate capacitance and RC time constants of circuits.

CAPACITORS, PART 2

Conditions exist in any transmission and distribution system that result in power losses in the systems and equipment that deliver power and in the systems and equipment that use power. In order to compensate for these power losses, utilities often use devices such as capacitor banks and shunt reactors. This course covers the functions of substation capacitors and reactors as well as how they can be safely cleared, maintained, and tested.

CONDUCTORS

Running cables and conductors is an integral part of electrical maintenance. The topics covered in this course include how cables and conductors are classified, the factors that must be considered in selecting a conductor or cable for a particular application, and procedures for installing, splicing and terminating cables and conductors used in low-voltage applications.

DC GENERATOR BASICS

A simple direct current (DC) generator consists of an armature coil with a single turn of wire. The armature coil cuts across the magnetic field to produce a voltage output. This course describes commutation in a DC generator, the major parts of a DC generator, and three basic ways a DC generator can be constructed.

DC MOTOR BASICS

Anyone who is responsible for maintaining direct current (DC) motors in an industrial facility must have a thorough understanding of the specific principles of operation, parts, and construction of DC motors. This course describes the principles of operation in a DC motor, DC motor parts, and how a DC motor is constructed.

ELECTRONIC CIRCUIT BOARD REPAIR

Today, almost all electronic devices have components placed on printed circuit boards. These boards are called printed circuit boards, or PCBs, because the conductive paths are printed on through a photographic process. Circuit boards are essential to the day-to-day operation of most electronic products. This course will describe how to identify defective circuit boards, as well as two common methods of troubleshooting.

ELECTROMAGNETIC RELAYS

When a fault occurs, current increases and voltage decreases. The increased current causes excessive heating, which depending on where the fault occurs, can result in a fire or an explosion. If the fault is not quickly isolated, it can cause damage that may result in loss of service. Various types of control systems are used to detect and isolate faults with minimum disturbance. A key component of all of these control systems is the protective relay. This course examines the functions and operation of some types of protective relays.

ESD PRECAUTIONS

This course covers the principles of electrostatic discharge and the necessary precautions that should be taken to avoid damage to sensitive equipment.

FUSES

This course introduces participants to the basic components of various types of fuses, explains how fuses are rated and sized, and describes basic procedures for troubleshooting a cartridge fuse.

GROUND FAULT CIRCUIT INTERRUPTERS

Normally, electric current is designed to flow through circuits at levels predetermined to be safe and return to the power source. Occasionally, conditions are created where the current amount or path is altered from the specified design. This course describes differences in the types of abnormal current flow that can occur within an electrical circuit because of the altered conditions and how ground fault circuit interrupters can protect against electrical shock.

GROUNDING

Grounding is the chief means of protecting life and property from electrical hazards such as lightning, line surges, short circuits, and ground faults. Grounding also helps ensure the proper operation of a system. This course provides an overview of what grounding is, why it is necessary, and effective grounding techniques.

INDUCTORS, PART 1

Inductance is defined as the ability of a coil to store energy, induce a voltage in itself, and oppose changes in current flowing through it. This course describes the construction of inductors and how they oppose changes in current. Participants will also learn how to calculate the total inductance for series and parallel circuits as well as the time constant of circuits.

INDUCTORS, PART 2

Conditions exist in any transmission and distribution system that result in power losses in the systems and equipment that deliver power and in the systems and equipment that use power. In order to compensate for these power losses, utilities often use devices such as capacitor banks and shunt reactors. This course provides an overview of the issues involved in working with substation shunt reactors and series reactors.

INSULATORS

Insulators, or nonconductors, are materials with electrons that are tightly bound to their atoms and require large amounts of energy to free them from the influence of the nucleus. Examples of insulators are rubber, plastics, glass, and dry wood. This course introduces participants to electrical insulators and their physical properties. In addition, it describes the various uses of insulators as well as some of the materials that are used as insulators.

INDUSTRIAL SWITCHES

Switches are often the controlling links between a plant’s electrical distribution system and individual pieces of electrical equipment. Basically, a switch is a device that can be opened or closed to start or stop current flow in a circuit. Different types of switches can serve different purposes. In this course, participants will learn to describe the uses and functions of pushbutton, rotary, disconnect, and transfer switches.

KIRCHHOFF’S LAWS

Kirchhoff’s two laws reveal a unique relationship between current, voltage, and resistance in electrical circuits that is vital to performing and understanding electrical circuit analysis. This course introduces Kirchhoff’s voltage and current laws and explains how to use these laws to calculate the voltage and current of circuits.

MAGNETS AND MAGNETIC FIELDS

Certain metals and metallic oxides have the ability to attract other metals. This property is called magnetism, and the materials that have this property are called magnets. Some magnets are found naturally while others must be manufactured. In this course, participants will learn about the characteristics and functions of magnets and electromagnets.

MEASURING CURRENT, VOLTAGE AND RESISTANCE

Troubleshooting, testing circuits, making adjustments, and other types of electrical maintenance work involve the use of test equipment. Most of the test equipment measures electrical properties such as current, voltage, and resistance. This course will reinforce understanding of the operation and use of various types of test equipment used to measure current, voltage, and resistance.

OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIER CIRCUITS

This course will explain what an op-amp is and what it does, as well as the most common operational amplifier, or op-amp, packages and schematic symbols. The course will explain voltage followers and how gain is calculated in inverting amplifiers. It will also describe typical inverting amplifier circuits and explain how gain is determined in non-inverting amplifiers. Finally, it will describe how to recognize non-inverting amplifier circuits on schematic diagrams.

USE OF OHM’s AND KIRCHHOFF’s LAWS in DC CIRCUITS

The relationship between current, voltage, and resistance was described by George Simon Ohm in a form that commonly is referred to as Ohm’s law. Ohm’s law states that current is equal to voltage divided by resistance. This law is often expressed using symbols for each quantity. The letter I is used to represent current, E represents voltage, and R represents resistance. Using these symbols, Ohm’s law can be expressed as I=E/R. Kirchhoff’s two laws also reveal a unique relationship between current, voltage, and resistance in electrical circuits that is vital to performing and understanding electrical circuit analysis. In this course, participants will learn how to use these laws when working with direct current (DC) circuits.

OHM’S LAW

The relationship between current, voltage, and resistance was described by George Simon Ohm in a form that is commonly referred to as Ohm’s Law. Ohm’s Law states that current is equal to voltage divided by resistance. This law is often expressed using symbols for each quantity. This course describes Ohm’s law; the units in which power is measured; and how to solve for power, voltage, current, and resistance using Ohm’s Law.

PARALLEL CIRCUITS

The components of an electrical or electronic circuit can be connected in many different ways. The two simplest of these are called series and parallel and occur very frequently. Components connected in parallel are connected so the same voltage is applied to each component. In this course, participants will learn about the fundamentals of parallel circuits as well as how to calculate current, voltage, and resistance in them.

PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLERS: ARCHITECTURE

Since their introduction several decades ago, programmable logic controllers, or PLCs, have become the most common way of controlling manufacturing equipment and processes. This course covers basic PLC concepts, provides an overview of a PLC system, examines a PLC processor, and describes the input and output systems of a PLC.

PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLERS: HUMAN-MACHINE INTERFACES AND TROUBLESHOOTING

Human-machine interfaces, or HMIs, come in many forms. Generally speaking, the simplest HMIs are the hard-wired pushbutton operator interfaces found on many machines. Other applications may use dedicated graphic interfaces or PC-based HMIs that can communicate through a network and are customized for a particular machine or process.

PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLERS: I/O COMMUNICATION

The most visible parts of the programmable logic controller system are the input system and the output system, the I/O for short. The I/O systems are the interfaces between the PLC processor and the world. A programmable logic controller is a microprocessor-based system that operates on low voltages, typically 5 volts. The real-world devices that control machines or processes operate on a wide range of voltages and currents, as high as 240 volts AC or 125 volts DC. This course will examine the various ways in which real-world devices can be connected to the input and output systems of a programmable logic controller.

PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLERS: INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING, PART 1

Ladder diagrams have been used in machine automation and process control applications for many years. Programmable logic controllers that are programmed to run ladder diagram programs have replaced virtually all hardwired controls. PLCs are cheaper and more versatile, and most importantly, they can be made to perform different functions by simply changing their programs. Once the PLC is installed and connected to the machine or process being controlled, it is almost ready to go. The last thing that needs to be done is to program the PLC to do its job. This course will detail how to enter a simple ladder diagram program into the memory of a programmable logic controller.

PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLERS: INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING, PART 2

Ladder diagrams have been used in machine automation and process control applications for many years. Programmable logic controllers (PLCs) that are programmed to run ladder diagram programs have replaced virtually all hardwired controls. PLCs are cheaper and more versatile, and most importantly, they can be made to perform different functions by simply changing their programs. Once the PLC is installed and connected to the machine or process being controlled, it is almost ready to go. The last thing that needs to be done is to program the PLC to do its job. This course will detail how to enter a simple ladder diagram program into the memory of a PLC.

PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLERS: LADDER LOGIC AND SYMBOLOGY

Ladder diagrams have been used to symbolically describe electrical control (PLC) systems for many decades. Early in the development of PLCs, it was decided to use ladder diagrams in their programming interface as well. This was done so that users of PLC systems would be able to see the program in a form that they were familiar with. Virtually all PLCs still use ladder diagrams. This course examines how PLCs use ladder diagrams to perform logic functions and the symbology involved.

PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLERS: NETWORKS AND NETWORK TROUBLESHOOTING

Most programmable logic controller (PLC) system problems are hardware related, and most of those are in the I/O systems. However, software and network problems do occur and are often the hardest types of problems to isolate. Isolating software and network problems takes a high degree of skill and a thorough understanding of the software tools that are available. This course will examine how to use the PLC programming software to troubleshoot software and network problems.

PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLERS: NUMERICS, PART 1

Programmable logic controllers (PLCs) use not only decimal numbers but also other numbering systems. This course covers the most widely used numbering systems, including how to convert between different numbering systems and how those numbering systems are used by PLCs in typical applications. This course will also examine codes used for storing information in PLCs.

PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLERS: NUMERICS, PART 2

Programmable logic controllers (PLCs) use not only decimal numbers but also other numbering systems. This course covers the most widely used numbering systems including how to convert between different numbering systems and how those numbering systems are used by PLCs in typical applications. This course will also examine codes used for storing information in PLCs.

PRINCIPLES OF SEMICONDUCTORS, PART 1: BIPOLAR TRANSISTORS

This course will demonstrate how to identify the names of the three regions of a bipolar transistor and how they are used to construct a bipolar transistor. It will also describe how the bipolar transistor is biased and the relationship between the emitter, base, and collector currents. Finally, the module will describe NPN and PNP schematic symbols.

PRINCIPLES OF SEMICONDUCTORS, PART 2: BIPOLAR TRANSISTORS

This course will describe the characteristic curves for the common emitter circuit including the unique characteristic curves for each transistor type. It will also discuss the importance of the Q point on a direct current (DC) load line. Finally, this course will explain how transistor amplification is affected by voltage divider resistors.

Programmable Logic Controllers: Program Entry, Testing, and Modification, Part 1

Installing and maintaining programmable logic controller (PLC) systems involves working with PLC equipment and hardware as well as communications and programming software. A major part of PLC work involves installing, debugging, and changing the program, or project, in a PLC processor. In order to do this work effectively, a thorough understanding of the system and the procedures needed for program entry, testing, and modification is necessary. This course will examine the techniques used initially to install and test a PLC program as well as how to make changes to PLC configurations and programs.

Programmable Logic Controllers: Program Entry, Testing, and Modification, Part 2

Installing and maintaining programmable logic controller systems (PLCs) involves working with PLC equipment and hardware as well as communications and programming software. A major part of PLC work involves installing, debugging, and changing the program, or project, in a PLC processor. In order to do this work effectively, a thorough understanding of the system and the procedures needed for program entry, testing, and modification is necessary. This course will examine the techniques used initially to install and test a PLC program as well as how to make changes to PLC configurations and programs.

PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLERS: PROGRAMMING FUNCTIONS, PART 1

Programmable logic controllers (PLCs) have been very successful because they can effectively use bit or discrete I/O instructions to receive inputs from switches and other binary sensors and then drive output field devices such as motor contactors, solenoid valves, and indicators. But modern PLCs are able to do much more by using additional instructions to perform more sophisticated functions such as timing, counting, calculating, manipulating data, and even making decisions. This course will examine many of these “non-I/O” PLC instructions.

PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLERS: PROGRAMMING FUNCTIONS, PART 2

Programmable logic controllers (PLCs) have been very successful because they can effectively use bit or discrete I/O instructions to receive inputs from switches and other binary sensors and then drive output field devices such as motor contactors, solenoid valves, and indicators. But modern PLCs are able to do much more by using additional instructions to perform more sophisticated functions such as timing, counting, calculating, manipulating data, and even making decisions. This course will examine many of these “non-I/O” PLC instructions.

PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLERS: TROUBLESHOOTING HARDWARE

The human-machine interface, or HMI, can be a very helpful aid to troubleshooting programming logic controller (PLC) hardware. By itself, however, the HMI cannot always provide information needed to troubleshoot a complex PLC system. Other aids must be used to help in hardware troubleshooting. This course will examine how to use the PLC itself, the HMI, and other test equipment to troubleshoot PLC hardware.

PLCS: TROUBLESHOOTING SOFTWARE, PART 1

Most PLC system problems are hardware related, and most of these are in the I/O systems. However, software and network problems do occur, and they are often the hardest types of problems to isolate. Isolating software and network problems takes a high degree of skill and a thorough understanding of the software tools that are available. This module will examine how to use the PLC programming software to troubleshoot software and network problems. It will also explore techniques and the hardware and software tools that are available for isolating software problems.

PLCS: TROUBLESHOOTING SOFTWARE, PART 2

Most PLC system problems are hardware related, and most of these are in the I/O systems. However, software and network problems do occur, and they are often the hardest types of problems to isolate. Isolating software and network problems takes a high degree of skill and a thorough understanding of the software tools that are available. This module will examine how to use the PLC programming software to troubleshoot software and network problems. It will also explore techniques and the hardware and software tools that are available for isolating software problems.

RESISTORS

This course introduces participants to the function and atomic makeup of resistors, common materials used to construct resistors, and the typical styles used in everyday applications. In addition, participants will learn about three ways to rate resistors as well as the different ways to mark resistors.

READING AND UNDERSTANDING SCHEMATICS

This course describes what schematic diagrams are and how to identify some of the common symbols used on electrical schematic diagrams. It also explains how the use of schematic diagrams can assist troubleshooting efforts.

SERIES CIRCUITS

The components of an electrical or electronic circuit can be connected in many different ways. The two simplest of these are called series and parallel and occur very frequently. Components connected in series are connected along a single path, so the same current flows through all of the components. In this course, you will learn about the fundamentals of series circuits as well as how to calculate current, voltage, and resistance in them.

SOURCES OF ELECTRICITY, PART 1

Sources of electricity typically refer to the different types of fuel or power used to generate electricity. With the exception of solar power, these sources all involve spinning a copper wire between magnets. This course describes how electricity is produced through electrochemical production, magnetic induction, and the photoelectric effect.

SERIES-PARALLEL CIRCUITS

The components of an electrical or electronic circuit can be connected in many different ways. The two simplest of these are called series and parallel and occur very frequently. Components connected in series are connected along a single path, so the same current flows through all of the components. Components connected in parallel are connected so the same voltage is applied to each component. In this course, you will learn about the fundamentals of series and parallel circuits as well as how to calculate current, voltage, and resistance in them.

TROUBLESHOOTING OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIER CIRCUITS

This course will explain the process for troubleshooting an operational amplifier circuit. It will describe how to identify and verify an operational amplifier circuit problem as well as the process to determine how the circuit works. It will also describe methods to isolate faulty components and correct the problem.

TROUBLESHOOTING POWER SUPPLIES

Rectifiers are essential for the operation of everyday electronics. However, problems with these rectifiers can arise, and it is just as essential to give these problems immediate attention. This course will serve as a brief discussion on how to troubleshoot both half-wave and full-wave rectifiers.

TROUBLESHOOTING SYSTEMS AND CIRCUITS

Electrical problems may show up anywhere at any time. Some problems are as simple as an abnormal signal value that can be corrected by a minor adjustment. Other problems are not as easy to identify and correct, especially when the cause of the problem is in a non-electrical component or in another system. Regardless of the cause, electricians are responsible for zeroing in on problems whenever they occur and bringing things back to normal. A good way to ensure that the proper actions are taken in response to an electrical problem is to follow a troubleshooting procedure that is both systematic and logical. This course describes the basics of troubleshooting, general guidelines and action steps, and a seven-step troubleshooting method for solving problems.

TRANSFORMERS

Substations and switchyards contain various types of transformers. Among them are power transformers, current transformers, and potential transformers. Each of these types of transformers has unique features that distinguish it from the other types of transformers and from other substation and switchyard equipment. In this course, you will learn about these transformers as well as their connections and basic principles.

VOLTAGE AND CURRENT PRINCIPLES

Voltage, electromotive force (emf), or potential difference is described as the pressure or force that causes electrons to move in a conductor. Electron current, or amperage, is described as the movement of free electrons through a conductor. This course introduces the principles of voltage and current through a discussion of the components of an atom and their charges as well as electrostatic forces, electromotive forces, and free electrons.

VARIABLE SPEED DRIVES: COMMON APPLICATIONS

Variable speed drives (VSDs) must always be carefully matched to the work that needs to be done. This can be easy when replacing a drive with an identical motor or controller. But other times, when identical replacements are not available, it is necessary to understand the various aspects of VSD applications. In addition, the motor and controller combination, the drive, is frequently integrated into an existing production process or system. This course will examine some of the common applications for VSDs.

VARIABLE SPEED DRIVES: CONTROLLERS AND TROUBLESHOOTING, PART 1

Troubleshooting today’s variable speed drives (VSDs) demands intimate knowledge of the systems in which they are installed, of the motors at the business end of the drive, and especially of the controllers that run them. This course will focus on the VSD controller, both as a troubleshooting tool and as a system component that may need troubleshooting itself. The course will examine troubleshooting from the controller, including a review of basic safety procedures, and the selection of test instruments. In addition, it will describe how a controller can help locate many of the most common operating problems.

VARIABLE SPEED DRIVES: CONTROLLERS AND TROUBLESHOOTING, PART 2

Troubleshooting today’s variable speed drives (VSDs) demands intimate knowledge of the systems in which they are installed, of the motors at the business end of the drive, and especially of the controllers that run them. This course will focus on the VSD controller, both as a troubleshooting tool and as a system component that may need troubleshooting itself. The course will examine troubleshooting from the controller, including a review of basic safety procedures, and the selection of test instruments. In addition, it will describe how a controller can help locate many of the most common operating problems.

VARIABLE SPEED DRIVES: INSTALLATION

Variable speed drives (VSDs) must always be carefully matched to the work that needs to be done. This can be easy when replacing a drive with an identical motor or controller. But other times, when identical replacements are not available, it is necessary to understand the various aspects of VSD applications. This course will examine a typical VSD installation, how to get it running, and how to keep it running while making its operation and maintenance as trouble-free as possible.

VARIABLE SPEED DRIVES: INTRODUCTION TO VSDS

Variable speed drives (VSDs) are used throughout the industry to electronically regulate the speed and the torque of motors. With nearly half the energy in the world consumed by rotating machinery, the applications for VSDs are enormous, and their use is spreading rapidly. When applied and installed properly and when operated and maintained correctly, VSDs can substantially reduce the power required for the work being done and can provide the precision control that is now demanded by modern industry throughout the world.

VARIABLE SPEED DRIVES: PROGRAMMING AC CONTROLLERS

This course describes alternating current (AC) controller setup procedures, AC controller frequency options and other parameter settings, and AC controller I/O configuration. The course illustrates how to interpret AC controller fault monitoring, alarms, and diagnostics. Finally, the course explains flux vector programming.

VARIABLE SPEED DRIVES: PROGRAMMING DC CONTROLLERS

Wherever variable speed drives (VSDs) are used, they must be programmed to meet the needs of the specific application. Sometimes this means little more than firing them up and letting them run, maybe just punching the drive up to the required speed. But more often it means a variety of settings must be programmed into the drive. This course will focus on programming the controllers for variable speed direct current (DC) motors.

VARIABLE SPEED DRIVES: SYSTEMS AND INTEGRATION

When variable speed drives (VSDs) are used in industrial applications, they usually are not used by themselves. Although single motors and single controllers are sometimes used in isolated applications, the more usual application is one in which many motors and many controllers are interlinked into a larger automated system that includes many types of processes. This course will examine the ways in which VSDs and automated systems are linked together.

VARIABLE SPEED DRIVES: SYSTEM TROUBLESHOOTING, PART 1

Troubleshooting variable speed drive (VSD) systems effectively almost always requires in-depth knowledge of the controller, but it also requires broad knowledge of the systems that the drives are often a part of. When things go wrong, the problem is usually not in the controller, but somewhere in the system: in the motor, in the drive’s links to the system, or in the electrical supply for the drive or the system. This course will focus on troubleshooting VSD systems.

VARIABLE SPEED DRIVES: SYSTEM TROUBLESHOOTING, PART 2

Troubleshooting variable speed drive (VSD) systems effectively almost always requires in-depth knowledge of the controller, but it also requires broad knowledge of the systems that the drives are often a part of. When things go wrong, the problem is usually not in the controller, but somewhere in the system: in the motor, in the drive’s links to the system, or in the electrical supply for the drive or the system. This course will focus on troubleshooting VSD systems.

AC FUNDAMENTALS REVIEW

This course is designed to aid in the training process by introducing participants to the basic principles involved in using electrical test equipment. Anyone who uses test equipment should be capable of operating and maintaining that test equipment. This capability must be the result of formal training and demonstrated through on-the-job training. Completion of the training process allows a person to be “qualified.” A person who does not meet this requirement should work under the direct supervision of a qualified person.

AC Generator Maintenance

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the operation and maintenance of large alternating current (AC) generators, which are primarily used to supply electrical power in the magnitude of kilowatts (thousands of watts) and megawatts (millions of watts). This course covers common AC generator maintenance tasks such as replacing brushes, performing overhauls, and conducting electrical tests.

DC MOTOR CONTROLLER MAINTENANCE, PART 1

This course provides participants with an introduction to direct current (DC) motor controller classification and parts identification, controller diagram symbols and schematics, and how DC motor controllers change motor speed and direction.

DC MOTOR CONTROLLER MAINTENANCE, PART 2

This course introduces participants to the basic steps for troubleshooting a direct current (DC) motor controller, different types of controller diagrams and how to read them, methods for identifying mechanical problems, and the maintenance needed to prevent or correct these problems.

DC FUNDAMENTALS REVIEW

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the operation and maintenance of large alternating current (AC) generators, which are primarily used to supply electrical power in the magnitude of kilowatts (thousands of watts) and megawatts (millions of watts). This course covers common AC generator maintenance tasks such as replacing brushes, performing overhauls, and conducting electrical tests.

READING ELECTRICAL DIAGRAMS, PART 1

Electrical diagrams are drawings in which lines, symbols, and letter and number combinations are used to represent electrical circuits. In some plants, electrical diagrams may also be called prints, or blueprints. No matter what they are called, however, these drawings are valuable tools for anyone involved in making new electrical installations, locating electrical problems, or modifying existing circuits. There are many different types of electrical diagrams. Each type is drawn differently to provide different information. The four types of electrical diagrams covered in this course are block diagrams, single-line diagrams, schematic diagrams, and wiring diagrams.

READING ELECTRICAL DIAGRAMS, PART 2

A great deal of electrical maintenance work depends on the ability of maintenance electricians to read and understand electrical diagrams. This course focuses on connection diagrams, interconnection diagrams, raceway diagrams, and logic diagrams.

SYNCHRONOUS MOTOR AND CONTROLLER MAINTENANCE

The fundamental relationships between current, voltage, and resistance in direct current (DC) circuits are basic to understanding all types of electricity and electrical circuitry. This course is intended as a general review of basic electrical concepts and circuit analysis for participants already possessing some background in electrical theory.

SINGLE-PHASE AC INDUCTION MOTOR MAINTENANCE

Most single-phase alternating current (AC) motors are small-horsepower motors designed to operate on standard single-phase AC current. They are found in a number of home and industrial tools, including vacuum cleaners, can openers, power saws, drills, and fans. Electrical maintenance personnel are responsible for keeping the single-phase motors in their plant in top operating condition and for repairing them correctly and quickly if the need arises. This course explains how single-phase AC induction motors operate and how they are classified. It also covers some common procedures for testing and maintaining them.

TRANSFORMER MAINTENANCE

This course is intended to provide participants with a basic background in transformer theory and connection schemes as well as an overview of the most common transformer types and the typical maintenance and testing procedures that apply to them.

USING ELECTRICAL TEST EQUIPMENT

Every system for AC power transmission, distribution, and use involves transformers. This course is intended to provide electrical maintenance students with a basic background in transformer theory and connection schemes, as well as provide an overview of the most common transformer types and the typical maintenance and testing procedures that apply to them. By studying the typical examples in the online course and in this handbook, participants will prepare themselves for learning the specific skills and procedures necessary for testing and maintaining transformers at their facilities.

BASIC ELECTRONICS, PART 1

In the study of electronics, knowledge of fundamental electrical relationships provides the foundation for developing advanced concepts and skills. This course covers the basic electrical quantities of current, voltage, resistance, and inductance that are universal to all circuits. An understanding of how electronic circuits work, and how they can be manipulated and repaired, depends on familiarity with these basic quantities and the relationships between them.

BASIC ELECTRONICS, PART 2

In the study of electronics, knowledge of fundamental electrical relationships provides the foundation for developing advanced concepts and skills. This course covers the basic electrical quantities of current, voltage, and capacitance that are universal to all circuits. An understanding of how electronic circuits work, as well as how they can be manipulated and repaired, depends on familiarity with these basic quantities and the relationships between them.

ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT, PART 1

This course focuses on three of the major components in an electrical system: unit transformers, switchyards, and substations. This course also describes how these components fit into an electrical system, how they operate, and how they are checked to make sure they continue to operate properly.

ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT, PART 2

Electrical power systems deliver electricity to customers and to the plant. This course teaches how electrical power systems deliver electricity to customers and how electrical power systems adjust voltage and current for more economical power delivery. It also shows how electrical power systems deliver electricity to plant equipment and how the station service system can help ensure a continuous flow of power to the plant in the event of certain equipment malfunctions. Finally, it describes the essential service system, which helps operators maintain control during an emergency.

ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS

This course explains the basic components of an electrical distribution system, its function, and typical monitoring and protective equipment in the system.

COST ESTIMATING: FUNDAMENTALS

Engineers, architects and contractors are often asked to prepare cost estimates when working on a new project. This 1-hour interactive online course takes you through the process discussing where, in the various stages in project development, cost estimates are made. Through illustrations, you will consider different methods of cost estimating, the level of project detail required for each, and when the use of each method is indicated. You will understand the uncertainties associated with a bid due to level of detail available and the economics of inflation. You will learn to recognize these uncertainties and include contingencies and adjustments for inflation. For those who are new to cost estimating, this course is an introduction. You may find yourself going over sections more than once. For the experienced Estimator, you will find this course a guide and a reference as the only way for any Estimator to improve is to practice what they have learned. Move on through this course and into the field of cost estimating.

SAFETY: ELECTRICAL PART 1 – FUNDAMENTALS, MATERIALS & EQUIPMENT GROUNDING

This 2-hour interactive online course that is the first of a two-part series which introduces you to many workplace situations that require you to work safely with electricity. You’ll learn how and why electricity can be dangerous. You’ll also learn about various methods used for protection. Safety begins with the careful installation of electrical components by means of approved wiring methods. You should use safety procedures and practices that insulate you from electricity’s power anytime you work with or near electrical equipment or components. Specifically, Part 1 looks at: Fundamentals of electricity & associated hazards Using proper materials and components equipment grounding.

SAFETY: ELECTRICAL PART 2 – HAZARDOUS LOCATION, CLEARANCES & SAFETY PRACTICE

This 2-hour online course is the second of a two-part series which introduces you to many workplace situations that require you to work safely with electricity. You’ll learn how and why electricity can be dangerous. You’ll also learn about various methods used for protection. Safety begins with the careful installation of electrical components by means of approved wiring methods. You should use safety procedures and practices that insulate you from electricity’s power anytime you work with or near electrical equipment or components. Specifically, Part 2 looks at: Hazardous locations Safe working clearances Safety practices.

ELECTRICAL TOOLS: DIGITAL MULTIMETERS I – OPERATION

A versatile electrical test instrument is the multimeter, which combines the functions of a voltmeter, ammeter, and ohmmeter into one device. This 2-hour interactive online course covers the basics of digital multimeters including the theory of operation, and introduces some of the factors that influence the design and operation of a multimeter. The theory of operation of multimeters is explored from the perspective of analog meter movements. Issues affecting the operation of a digital multimeter such as resolution, accuracy, and waveform impacts are discussed. The appropriate IEC safety standards are presented, which allow users to select the appropriate meter for their application. This course is the first in a series of courses about digital multimeters.

ELECTRICAL TOOLS: DIGITAL MULTIMETERS II – APPLICATIONS

A multimeter is a versatile electrical test instrument which combines the functions of a voltmeter, ammeter, and ohmmeter into one device. This 1-hour interactive online course is the second in a series about digital multimeters. This installment covers some of the application issues with digital multimeters and begins with the basic measurements of volts, ohms, and amps. A common digital multimeter feature, the diode tester, is reviewed and the methods to determine the condition of diodes and transistors are reviewed. The course shows how to test fuses in both single-phase and three-phase applications and how to verify that a utility meter base is wired correctly. Procedures to test residential wiring using three simple test procedures are explained as well as how to test the electrical parameters of single-phase and three-phase motors.

OVERCURRENT PROTECTION II – COORDINATION

This 3-hour interactive online course reviews the principles of operation and coordination of electric system equipment during faulted conditions. Since short circuits have such damaging impacts on electrical equipment, their impact on the components in the circuit must be understood.The purpose of this course is to explain how the various protective devices react to faulted conditions and how to select the appropriate devices to ensure proper coordination. The theory of operation of protective devices is reviewed as well as how to properly coordinate the devices for selective coordination. Various electrical devices are reviewed including fuses, current limiting fuses, circuit breakers, transformers, conductors, busways, and motor controllers.
This course reviews the principles of electrical equipment operation and coordination on an electric system during faulted conditions.

STRATEGIES FOR IMPLEMENTING NFPA 70E®

Electrocution in the workplace is one of the leading causes of workplace fatalities. This course will educate qualified electrical professionals on the potential hazards of working on or around electricity, and the necessary precautions they will need to take to work safely. This course will focus on how an electric arc flash occurs, PPE protection requirements, hazards of electricity, NFPA 70E® compliance strategies and habits of safe electrical workers.

2015 NFPA 70E® – SIGNIFICANT CHANGES

The 2015 edition of NFPA 70E Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace® has recently been issued, and there are significant changes to the standard. This course is designed to
inform you about important changes made from the 2012 edition so you will have
knowledge of the most up-to-date information.

ELECTRICAL AND ARC FLASH HAZARDS

This course is designed to provide an applicable working awareness in identifying the hazards of working on or near electrical circuits, conductors, or equipment and the minimum level of safe work practices necessary to protect a person from these hazards. The course is based on the safe work practices documented in the 2015 NFPA 70E Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace, OSHA 29 CFR 1910 Subpart S, and OSHA 29 CFR 1926 Subpart K. It is the intention of the course to provide a substantial understanding of the primary electrical hazards, typical safe work practices that should be applied when working on or near the hazards, and a systematic method for determining and selecting the correct PPE based on the type and level of exposure.

PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLERS (PLC’S) – INTRODUCTION AND THEORY OF OPERATIONS

This interactive online course offers a thorough introduction into programmable logic controllers (PLCs). We will begin with an overview of the history and the role PLCs play in factory automation. We will discuss the basic principles of PLCs and core modules of an industrial control system. Functions (analog input and output), disturbed control interface, I/O’s (digital inputs and outputs), the COU, and isolation power will also be examined.

PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLERS (PLC’S) – LOGIC OPERATIONS

This interactive online course includes a comprehensive look at basic electrical circuits and includes information on converting a schematic to LAD instruction. Logic operations include any operations that manipulate Boolean values. Boolean values are either true or false and they are named after English mathematician George Boole, who invented Boolean algebra, and is widely considered the founder of computer science theory. They can also be represented as 1 and 0. Normally, 1 represents true, and 0 represents false, but it could be the other way around.

PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLERS (PLC’S) – HARDWARE, INPUTS, OUTPUTS, DISCRETE/ANALOG

This interactive online course is designed to help you understand the hardware used in PLC’s as well as how discrete and analog inputs and outputs permit the programmer to aid machinery in performing at a more efficient and stable state.

Inputs are signals or data received by a system and outputs are the signals or data sent from it. Input/output (I/O) devices are used by a human, or system, to communicate with a computer. For instance, a keyboard is an input device for a computer, while a monitor is an output device.This course will examine the primary causes of faults associated with PLC based control systems: I/O devices and field wiring. We will discuss both hardware and software which will aid in finding these faults quickly. You will be introduced to analog inputs and outputs. These include sensors and actuators that will be of use for industrial measurements and movements.

PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLERS (PLC’S) – PROGRAMMING A PLC SYSTEM

Programming a PLC system provides the basic technical skills and knowledge necessary to work with programmable logic control systems typically found in an industrial or manufacturing environment. This interactive online course is designed to equip the novice with little or no prior PLC programming experience with the basic tools necessary to create a complete PLC program using ladder logic common to most current platforms.

Upon completion, you will be able to use programmable logic controllers to solve machine and process problems. A systems approach to PLC programming training is used because the programmable logic controller is one major component of larger manufacturing systems.

PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLERS (PLC’S) – DESIGN AND INSTALLATION OF A PLC SYSTEM

The purpose of this unit is to teach the basic principles of protective relays and to introduce directional and non-directional relays. The unit begins with the basic theory of protective relays, commonly used types of relays, and a brief explanation of how these relays are used. Additional details and examples of applications are provided for directional and non-directional relays. At the conclusion of this unit, the trainees should have a basic understanding of how protective relays work. They should be able to explain the need for protective relays and to list commonly used types of relays and their functions. They should also be able to explain how directional and non-directional relays work and give examples of situations in which they are used.

ELECTRICAL MAINTENANCE: RELAYS, PART 1

The purpose of this unit is to teach the basic principles of protective relays and to introduce directional and non-directional relays. The unit begins with the basic theory of protective relays, commonly used types of relays, and a brief explanation of how these relays are used. Additional details and examples of applications are provided for directional and non-directional relays. At the conclusion of this unit, the trainees should have a basic understanding of how protective relays work. They should be able to explain the need for protective relays and to list commonly used types of relays and their functions. They should also be able to explain how directional and non-directional relays work and give examples of situations in which they are used.

ELECTRICAL MAINTENANCE: RELAYS, PART 2

The purpose of this unit is to continue the development begun in Relays, Part 1 by introducing differential and pilot relays and discussing routine relay maintenance. The relays examined are differential relays and pilot relays used for differential comparison, phase comparison, and transfer tripping. The unit demonstrates how to inspect and maintain relays and how to put them in and out of service. At the conclusion of this unit, trainees should be able to explain how differential and pilot relays work and give examples of situations where they are used. They should also be able to describe how to approach routine inspection and maintenance and how to put a relay in or out of service.